History of Domestic and Foreign Commerce of the United States - Vol. 1

By Emory R. Johnson; T. W. Van Metre et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VI.
EIGHTEENTH CENTURY TO THE OUTBREAK OF THE REVOLUTION.
Effect of wars upon progress of American commerce , 84.
Estimated population of the colonies in 1700 and 1760, 85.
General industrial and commercial changes from 1700 to 1775, 86.
The value and growth of the commerce of the colonies, (a) with Great Britain, 88,
(b) with sections of world outside of Great Britain, go.
Value and distribution of trade of colonies in 1769 , 92.
Trade with the West Indies, 93.
The Sugar Act of 1733 and its slight effect ,95.
Illegal trading of the colonies during the Seven Years' War, 96.
The illegal trade with the French at Monte Cristi, 98.
Trade with West Indies after 1763 ,99.
The African slave trade,100.
Causes of the slave trade , 102.
Commerce from the Peace of Paris to the Declaration of Independence, (a) value of exports and imports, 105,
(6) prosperity of whaling and other fisheries, 106.
Great Britain's bounties on hemp, masts, indigo, and naval stores, 106.
Failure of British taxes on commerce of the colonies , 107.
Monetary conditions as affecting commerce in the eighteenth century , 108.
Summary , 110.
Sources of statistical information concerning American colonial commerce, 112.
Documentary sources and other references , 113.
Statistics of exports from the colonies in 1770, 118.
Statistics of the trade between Great Britain and the colonies, 1697 to 1776, 120.

The development of American commerce during the larger part of the eighteenth century took place under conditions that would to-day render international trade almost impossible; but, in spite of adverse circumstances, there was large and almost continuous progress. Had Great Britain been disposed, and had she been able, to enforce strictly the Acts of Trade, the commerce of her colonies must necessarily have been seriously hampered, mainly because the growth of the West Indian trade would have been checked; but serious effort to enforce those acts was postponed until within about a decade of the Revolution, and the attempt even then was largely unsuccessful. Indeed, the dozen years intervening between the peace of Paris and the battle of Lexington were the years during which the colonial trade reached its maximum value.

Four prolonged wars interfered with the peaceful progress of American commerce during the first sixty-three years of the century. The desperate struggles of European countries for political and commercial leadership were inevitably shared in large measure by the American colonies of Spain, France, and England, with the result that the ocean commerce of the colonies was for considerable periods of time subjected to the risks of warfare, privateering, and its natural accompaniment, piracy. The last and the most epoch-making of the four conflicts-- the seven years war in Europe, called the French and Indian War in America--was, as far as England and France were concerned, a struggle for supremacy in India and America. It involved the colonies in active war; indeed, it war the victories of the British and colonial forces over the French in America that compelled France to turn over her vast possessions in America and India to Great Britain and to the shaping influences of British civilization.

-84-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
History of Domestic and Foreign Commerce of the United States - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 364

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.