Jenny Lind: the Swedish Nightingale

By Gladys Denny Shultz | Go to book overview

CHAPTER EIGHTEEN
Jenny Makes Up Her Mind

AT LEAST ONE of Jenny's doubts had apparently been dissolved by the time she confessed her dilemma to Judge Munthe. There was a peaceful, happy interlude in early July of 1851, when the little troupe, now consisting only of Jenny, Belletti, Salvi, Joseph Burke and Otto Goldschmidt, went to Springfield, Massachusetts, to give a concert. Jenny stayed at the Warriner home on Howard Street, which had been redecorated for the occasion, and fell so in love with Springfield, and was so comfortable at the Warriners', that she made the house her headquarters for a week.

The concert was held on July 1, in the old First Congregational Church, which was jammed with as many people as it could possibly hold while "a great throng, unable to enter, heard what they could of the concert through the open windows."

The next morning five hundred school children gathered beneath the balcony of Jenny's room to serenade her, and she tossed carnations down to them. Two days later, by unanimous request of the townspeople, she reviewed the Fourth of July parade from the same balcony. As long as the Warriner house stood, many people used to visit the second-floor rooms Jenny had occupied. And when the house was torn down, the balcony from which she had reviewed the parade and dropped carnations to the school children was preserved in a local museum.

The Springfield Post commented, "The best musical performances here rarely draw over 300 or 400 people at 25 cents a ticket. In this case, the

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