Introduction

WAGES are of prime importance in any advanced economy such as ours. They affect us all far more than seems evidenced in our concern about them.

Everyone buys wages, in a sense, with every purchase he makes. And three-fourths of all incomes in the United States represent pay for work done in the employ of another. So nearly every one of us is on both sides of the wage exchange, in one way or another.

We all know in a general way that wages have been rising for a long time in this country, but there is evidence aplenty that the economic principles which apply to wage problems are not well understood. Probably they are no better understood now than in the early thirties when measures adopted to combat the depression proved to be such colossal failures. Fearing another depression like that which followed World War I, we now seem enmeshed in chronic and progressive inflation, which Lenin once said was a sure and simple way to destroy the capitalist system. Our "prosperity" now seems to be riding on the horns of a dilemma that will surely end in the destruction of capitalism unless we can resolve this problem which in large measure is a wage problem.

I shall deal with the wage problem in a manner that may seem oversimplified. Basic principles always have a way of seeming simple. Yet if they be principles, they can no more

-5-

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Why Wages Rise
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • Contents 3
  • Charts and Tables 4
  • Introduction 5
  • 1. Labor Unions 9
  • 2. Productivity 14
  • 3. Dividing the Pie 19
  • 4. Tools to Harness Energy 28
  • 15. Doing What You Can Do Best 35
  • 6. the Lubricant for Exchange 43
  • 7. Contracting for Progress 53
  • 8. the Cost of Being Governed 63
  • 9- Losing Pay Through Fringe Benefits 72
  • 10. Leisure and the Better Life 84
  • 11. Pricing an Hour of Work 95
  • 12- Riding the Waves Of Business 107
  • Index 121
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