The Parlement of Foules: An Interpretation

By J. A. W. Bennett | Go to book overview

CHAPTER III
Nature and Venus

Then forth issewed (great goddesse) great Dame Nature,
With goodly port and gracious Maiesty
Being far greater and more tall of stature
Then any of the gods or Powers on high;

. . . . . . . . . . .

So hard it is for any living wight
All her array and vestiments to tell,
That old Dan Geffrey (in whose gentle spright
The pure well head of Poesie did dwell)
In his Foules Parley durst not with it mel.

The Faerie Queene, VII. vii. 5, 9

lo vinco d'amor che fa Natura.

Inferno, xi. 56

Quantas rerum flectat habenas
Natura potens, quibus immensum
Legibus orbem provida servet,
Stringatque ligans inresoluto
Singula nexu, placet arguto
Fidibus lentis promere cantu
.

De Consolatione Philosophiae. iii, m. 2

IN Chaucer's transport as he begins to speak of Dame Nature, and in the exalted position to which he here assigns her--twice within twenty lines she is called 'noble', and this poet does not use such epithets lightly--we may discern the last effects of the impact made by philosophy on poetry in the time of Alain of Lille and again in the time of Jean de Meun. Differing as these eclectic poets do, they yet agree that Nature is the vicegerent of God, and that only God can tell her ineffable beauty:

-107-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Parlement of Foules: An Interpretation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • List of Plates ix
  • Prologue 1
  • Chapter I - The Proem 25
  • Chapter II - Park of Paradise and Garden of Love 62
  • Chapter III - Nature and Venus 107
  • Chapter IV - Love's Meinie 134
  • Envoy 181
  • Appendix - Natura, Nature, and Kind 194
  • Bibliographical Note 213
  • Index 215
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 222

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.