XIII

CONSTANCE was at first very happy, alone with Hilda. They motored down to London and had a couple of days there by themselves, shopping and going to the theatre.

"It's awfully nice to be manless for a while, don't you think?" said the younger sister to the elder.

"I think it's a mistake, anyhow, to have a man permanently about," said Hilda. "Men and women are so different, why should they be chained together? One of them has to give way to the other, and whichever one it is, the result is nasty, in my opinion. Marriage is a mistake."

Constance pondered this.

"Yes!" she admitted. "I suppose it is! Men are either dense or exhausting. It's a relief to be away from them altogether for a time."

"For most of the time," said Hilda.

But Constance was a little more old-fashioned and shrinking than her sister. Hilda had a certain sombre splendour about her. She really despised men. She despised her father; she had despised her husband, she despised him even now for paying her quite a good income: she despised and disliked Clifford: Heaven knows how she would have despised Parkin. Altogether it was a queer go!

Yet she was very handsome, beautiful and warm- coloured and so womanly-looking, with the same soft brown hair as Constance, and big, slow gray eyes. A sort of Brunhild, waging an invisible war, she lived a great

-161-

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The First Lady Chatterley
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • A Foreword by Frieda Lawrence v
  • A Manuscript Report by Esther Forbes xv
  • I 3
  • II 17
  • III 26
  • IV 38
  • V 52
  • VI 61
  • VII 73
  • VIII 86
  • IX 108
  • X 118
  • XII 147
  • XIII 161
  • XIV 170
  • XV 189
  • XVI 196
  • XIX 231
  • XX 251
  • XXI 272
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