XXI

ON THE Sunday morning she set off for a drive with Duncan in his little two-seater. Duncan was a clever driver, and he loved speed. They were going for a run in the Peak district.

But as they were passing through Tevershall somebody saluted her. For a moment she did not realize. Then the figure in the navy blue suit and black hat jumped into her consciousness as the car passed on. She looked back. He too was looking back. It was her Op, as Duncan called him.

"Stop a minute! Stop!" she said hastily.

Duncan put on the brakes.

"Something wrong?" he said.

"Only I want to speak to somebody."

The car stood by the curb, Constance turning to look round. She waved to Parkin, and he came slowly forward towards the car, lifting the black hat. And in spite of the warmth she felt for him, Constance saw him ridiculous, rather small, rather stiff, with his ragged moustache sticking out and his wary movement. A ridiculous little male, on his guard and wary in his own self-importance! When the sex glamour is in abeyance practically every modern woman sees her man in this light, the light of her contemptuous superiority. It is the sex warmth alone that makes men and women possible to one another. Reduce them to simple individuality, to the assertive personal egoism of the modern individual, and each sees in the other the enemy. The woman, feeling for some reason triumphant in our day, man having yielded most of the

-272-

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The First Lady Chatterley
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • A Foreword by Frieda Lawrence v
  • A Manuscript Report by Esther Forbes xv
  • I 3
  • II 17
  • III 26
  • IV 38
  • V 52
  • VI 61
  • VII 73
  • VIII 86
  • IX 108
  • X 118
  • XII 147
  • XIII 161
  • XIV 170
  • XV 189
  • XVI 196
  • XIX 231
  • XX 251
  • XXI 272
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