Working Class USA: The Power and the Movement

By Gus Hall | Go to book overview

About This Book

THROUGHOUT THE AGES RULING CLASSES HAVE DOWNPLAYED, covered up and suppressed the notion that there is any such thing as a class struggle. And yet human history is one story after another of the people -- working people -- fighting for and winning their freedom from exploiters and oppressors. That is the class struggle.

Nowhere in the world is it more important to keep this fact in mind than in our country with a ruling class unmatched by any in its efforts to deny that the class struggle exists -- especially in our "classless" USA.

The class struggle in the United States is practically an untold story. It is not taught in the schools, never mentioned by Republicans or Democrats, there are no shows about it on TV nor stories in the major newspapers. But it goes on as a daily part of our lives. It affects everything.

To try and understand what's happening today without seeing the class struggle is like trying to drive without seeing the road. Before long you'll end up in a ditch!

Even within the workingclass movement there have been those who have denied that the class struggle is with us for as long as we have had capitalism. Especially during and following the period of McCarthyism -- the counteroffensive of Big Business -- there was a deafening chorus of those saying the

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