Prime-Time Feminism: Television, Media Culture, and the Women's Movement since 1970

By Bonnie J. Dow | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book has been in process for a number of years. Portions of it began as a dissertation at the University of Minnesota. I would like to thank Karlyn Kohrs Campbell for her incisive direction of that project, for educating me as a critic, and for her continuing encouragment, support, and friendship.

As this book has moved from a proposal to a reality, a number of people have influenced its shape. Celeste Condit's comments on the original proposal influenced my thinking more than she probably thought they would. Patricia Smith, the Women's Studies acquisitions editor at the University of Pennsylvania Press, has my gratitude for reacting so enthusiastically to the proposal, for pursuing the project, and for being consistently helpful at every stage in its completion. During the review process, the comments of Mimi White and Nina Leibman were generous, insightful, and tremendously valuable in guiding this book to what I hoped it would become.

Time and again the research necessary for this book overreached the resources of the NDSU library. Time and again, the Interlibrary Loan staff managed to get me what I needed, quickly and efficiently, never complaining about my endless requests and my absentmindedness about due dates. They have my deepest appreciation, as does Laurie Baker, my graduate student, who did some last minute research and fact checking for me that greatly helped in the final stages of preparing the manuscript.

I would like to acknowledge the assistance of the Speech Communication Association, which granted permission to reprint portions of Chapter 1 that first appeared in "Hegemony, Feminist Criticism, and The Mary Tyler Moore Show," Critical Studies in Mass Communication, 7 ( Fall 1990): 261-274, and portions of Chapter 3 that first appeared in "Performance of Feminine Discourse in Designing Women", Text and Performance Quarterly, 12 ( 1992): 125-145. In addition, portions of Chapter 4 first appeared in "Femininity and Feminism in Murphy Brown",

-ix-

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