Matisse: A Portrait of the Artist and the Man

By Raymond Escholier; Geraldine Colvile et al. | Go to book overview

VII
IN SEARCH OF THE ABSOLUTE

IT was during one of his three visits to America, all of which were short, that his decoration, Le Concert (about 3 m x 1 m 80) was placed in position. It was executed in 1938 for Nelson Rockefeller. About the same time, Mrs Rockefeller bought one of the best still lifes, Torse antique et bouquet d'œillets blancs, in which Matisse shows his life-long taste for Greek sculpture.

Although he went there three times, Matisse never stayed in America as long as he would have liked.

Before him, it was the fashion among official painters, come from France to the United States, and even among artists born in the U.S.A., to speak ill of the light of the New World, to declare it was not paintable. With the arrival of those faithful to pure colour--Henri Matisse, Raoul Dufy, Fernand Léger--suddenly 'the scene shifted'. The painter of Bonheur de Vivre had found such limpid atmosphere only in Nice.

'Shall I tell you?' he confided to Aragon. . . . 'Nice. . . why Nice? In my art, I have tried to create a crystalline state for the mind: I have found the limpid quality necessary in several places in the world, in New York, the South Sea Islands, and Nice. If I had painted in the North, as thirty years ago, my painting would have been different: there would have been mists, greys, gradations of colour in perspective. In New York painters say, "we can't paint here, with this sky made of zinc!" In reality, it is admirable. Everything becomes clear-cut, crystalline, precise, limpid. Nice was a help to me in that way. You must understand that what I paint are objects thought of plastically: if I shut my eyes, I see the objects better than with my eyes open, free of accidental detail; that is what I paint. . . .'

And it was not only the crystal light which delighted Matisse in the United States. He was deeply interested in the museums of the New World, so rich in independent French painting. 'At the Barnes Foundation, in Merion,' Matisse once said to me, 'I have seen the most beautiful museum of modern art. Our masters are represented by their most important works, of remarkable quality.'

It is well known, also, what a large place is devoted there to the Ecole de Paris, glorious school which has spread the fame of French art all over the world. Its

-143-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Matisse: A Portrait of the Artist and the Man
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 7
  • Illustrations 9
  • Introduction And Notes on the Illustrations 11
  • Foreword 17
  • I- The Pure Act of Painting 21
  • II- Fauves and Odalisques 57
  • IV- Crystal Light 110
  • V- Black and White 119
  • VI- The Sculptor 138
  • VII- In Search of the Absolute 143
  • VIII- The Road to Paradise 179
  • Index 214
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 226

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.