The Letters of Queen Victoria: A Selection from Her Majesty's Correspondence between the Years 1837 and 1861 - Vol. 3

By Queen Victoria; Viscount Esher et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXIII 1854

The Earl of Aberdeen to Queen Victoria.

LONDON, 6thJanuary 1854.

LORD ABERDEEN presents his humble duty to your Majesty. He cannot wonder at the indignation expressed by your Majesty at the base and infamous attacks made upon the Prince during the last two or three weeks in some of the daily papers.1 They are chiefly to be found in those papers which represent ultra-Tory or extreme Radical opinions; but they are not sanctioned by the most respectable portion of the Press. Lord Aberdeen has received some information respecting the origin of these attacks; but it is vague and uncertain. At all events he believes that your Majesty may safely make yourself at ease upon the subject, as he is satisfied that these hostile feelings are shared by few. It is much to be desired that some notice of the subject may be taken in Parliament, when, by being treated in a proper manner, it may be effectually stopped. Lord Aberdeen has spoken to Lord John Russell, who will be quite prepared to moot it in the House of Commons.

It cannot be denied that the position of the Prince is somewhat anomalous, and has not been specially provided for by the Constitution; but the ties of Nature, and the dictates of common sense are more powerful than Constitutional fictions; and Lord Aberdeen can only say that he has always considered it an inestimable blessing that your Majesty should possess so able, so zealous, and so disinterested an adviser. It is true that your Ministers are alone responsible for the conduct of public affairs, and although there is no man in England whose opinion Lord Aberdeen would more highly respect and value, still if he had the misfortune of differing

____________________
1
A section of the Press, favourable to Lord Palmerston, had insinuated that his resignation wax due to "an influence behind the throne." Similar attacks were made by other journals, and not abandoned upon Lord Palmerston's re-admission to the Cabinet: the most extravagant charges of improper interference in State affairs were made against the Prince, and it was even rumoured that he had been impeached for high treason and committed to the Tower! The cartoons in Punch usually present a faithful reflection of current popular opinion, and in one of them the Prince was depicted as skating, in defiance of warning, over dangerous ice.

-3-

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The Letters of Queen Victoria: A Selection from Her Majesty's Correspondence between the Years 1837 and 1861 - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Table of Contents iii
  • List of Illustrations vii
  • Introductory Note To Chapter XXIII 1
  • Chapter XXIII 1854 3
  • Introductory Note - To Chapter XXIV 63
  • Chapter XXIV - 1855 65
  • Introductory Note To Chapter XXV 158
  • Chapter XXV - 1856 160
  • Introductory Note - To Chapter XVII 223
  • Chapter XVII - 1857 225
  • Introductory Note - To Chapter XXVII 261
  • Chapter XXVII - 1858 263
  • Introductory Note To Chapter XXVIII 307
  • Chapter XXVIII - 1859 309
  • Introductory Note To Chapter XXIX 379
  • Chapter XXIX - 1860 382
  • Introductory Note - To Chapter XXX 420
  • Chapter XXX - 1861 422
  • Index 479
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