The Letters of Queen Victoria: A Selection from Her Majesty's Correspondence between the Years 1837 and 1861 - Vol. 3

By Queen Victoria; Viscount Esher et al. | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTORY NOTE
TO CHAPTER XXVII

ON the 25th of January of the new year ( 1858) Prince Frederick William of Prussia (afterwards the Emperor Frederick) was married, with brilliant ceremonial, to the Princess Royal, at the Chapel Royal, St James's, an event marked by general national rejoicings; another event in the private life of the Queen, but one of a melancholy character, was the death of the Duchess of Orleans at the age of forty-four.

A determined attempt was made by Orsini, Pierri, and others, members of the Carbonari Society,to assassinate the Emperor and Empress of the French by throwing grenades filled with detonating powder under their carriage. The Emperor was only slightly hurt, but several bystanders were killed, and very many more wounded. The plot had been conceived, and the grenades manufactured in England, and a violently hostile feeling was engendered in France against this country, owing to the prescriptive right of asylum enjoyed by foreign refugees. The French militaires were particularly vehement in their language, and Lord Palmerston so far bowed to the demands of the French Foreign Minister as to introduce a Bill to make the offence of conspiracy to murder, a felony instead of, as it had previously been, a misdemeanour. The Conservative Party supported the introduction of the Bill, but, on the second reading, joined with eighy-four Liberals and four Peelites in supporting an Amendment by Mr Milner Gibson, postponing the reform of the Criminal Law till the peremptory demands of Count Walewski had been formally answered. The Ministry was defeated and resigned, and Lord Derby and Mr Disraeli returned to Office. Orsini and Pierri were executed in Paris, but the state trial in London of a Dr Bernard, a resident of Bayswater, for complicity, ended, mainly owing to the menacing attitude of France over the whole question, in an acquittal. The Italian nationality of the chief conspirators endangered, but only temporarily, the important entente between France and Sardinia.

Before the resignation of the Ministry, the thanks of both Houses of Parliament were voted to the civil and military officers of India for their exertions in suppressing the Mutiny; the Opposition endeavoured to obtain the omission of the name of Lord Canning from the address, till his conduct of affairs had been discussed. The difficulties in India were not at an end, for Sir Colin Campbell had been unable to hold Lucknow, and had transferred the rescued garrison to Cawnpore, which he re-occupied. It was not till the end of

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The Letters of Queen Victoria: A Selection from Her Majesty's Correspondence between the Years 1837 and 1861 - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Table of Contents iii
  • List of Illustrations vii
  • Introductory Note To Chapter XXIII 1
  • Chapter XXIII 1854 3
  • Introductory Note - To Chapter XXIV 63
  • Chapter XXIV - 1855 65
  • Introductory Note To Chapter XXV 158
  • Chapter XXV - 1856 160
  • Introductory Note - To Chapter XVII 223
  • Chapter XVII - 1857 225
  • Introductory Note - To Chapter XXVII 261
  • Chapter XXVII - 1858 263
  • Introductory Note To Chapter XXVIII 307
  • Chapter XXVIII - 1859 309
  • Introductory Note To Chapter XXIX 379
  • Chapter XXIX - 1860 382
  • Introductory Note - To Chapter XXX 420
  • Chapter XXX - 1861 422
  • Index 479
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