A History of Political Thought in the Sixteenth Century

By J. W. Allen | Go to book overview

PART III
FRANCE

CHAPTER I
PRELIMINARY

IN Germany, owing largely to the chaotic nature of its political constitution, the controversy of the sixteenth century was, from the first, and remained, far more religious and juristic than political. The issues were, it is true, largely political and the results more political than religious. But the political issues of the conflict were difficult to disentangle at a time when nobody knew whether Germany were a monarchy, an aristocracy or a federation. Controversy turned mainly on questions of theology and questions as to the nature of the Church or on the question of the legal relation of Princes of the Empire to the Emperor. The main political question that was raised was as to the rights and duties of secular rulers in relation to religion and the Church. In England the main question in debate was of the import and implications of the conception of a national Church under royal supremacy. It was a conflict between modes of thought all but frankly and simply political and utilitarian and modes of thought essentially religious. There, too, the controversy turned largely on religious beliefs. But in France, from beginning to end, the controversy was far more political than religious.

At the commencement of the sixteenth century, France, though far more settled than Germany, was yet, in many respects, chaotic. In every part of its territory, the action of the central government was limited or obstructed by clerical, noble, provincial and communal privilege or custom. All powers were already claimed for the King; but his recognized positive rights varied from province to province. The centralized machinery of administration, so far as it existed, was at once extremely insufficient and very imperfectly controlled. Law varied from province to province and even from town to town. Though France was very conscious of its Frenchness, yet popular sentiment was very largely local rather than national. All through the century men talk of going out of Guienne into France.

-271-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A History of Political Thought in the Sixteenth Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 530

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.