A History of Political Thought in the Sixteenth Century

By J. W. Allen | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IV THE HUGUENOTS AND THEIR ALLIES

§ 1. PRELIMINARY

WE have now to deal with that great controversy that animated France from about 1560 till the triumphant entry of Henry IV into a converted Paris. Many issues were involved in it and many were the points of view that found expression. Some of those view-points were not distinctively religious in any sense at all. Yet, to a great extent, both sides grounded their argumentation on a religious or theocratic conception of the State. Because that was so, both sides appealed, habitually, to the Scriptures. It could hardly have been otherwise, seeing that Catholic and Protestant alike, for the most part, held that all real authority is derived from God and that all real obligation is to Him. It would, indeed, have been possible to argue for the divine right of this or that without reference to the Scriptures. But it would have been harder to do and far less effective when done. Both sides consciously appealed to a mass of ignorant and not very intelligent people. Since the Protestants appealed to the Bible, needs must the Catholics have done so; since the royalists appealed to them, rebels had to do the same. So both sides made all the use they could of Samuel and Saul and David and Daniel. One wonders a little, finding in pamphlet after pamphlet the same manifestly inconclusive arguments, why it was that neither saw the futility of it all. For, evidently, Saul and David were as much use to one side as to the other. It seems, indeed, to be the case that, as time went on, there was relatively less of argumentation from the text of Scripture. Yet, at the very end of the century, Alexander Barclay was going, wearisomely and exhaustively, over the trodden ground.

It is the views and theories set forth on the Huguenot side of the controversy that are first to be considered. It may be said at once that nothing that should be called 'the political theory of the Huguenots' ever, in fact, existed. The attitude of the Huguenots as a party is one thing in 1562, another in 1567. In the period of desperation and experiment after 1572, what may, rather roughly, be called two distinct theories were set forth by Huguenot writers. Neither of them

-302-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A History of Political Thought in the Sixteenth Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 530

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.