A History of Political Thought in the Sixteenth Century

By J. W. Allen | Go to book overview

CHAPTER V
SALAMONIUS AND BUCHANAN § 1. SALAMONIUS

THE De Principatu1 of Marius Salamonius was published at Rome, 'cum privilegio summi pontifici,' as early as 1544. The author appears to have been a Spaniard and no more than that is certainly known about him apart from his writings.2 The book is in the form of a discussion between a Lawyer, a Philosopher, an Historian and a Theologian. In the main it consists in an argument between Lawyer and Philosopher as to the meaning of the Lex Regia and whether and in what sense the Prince is legibus solutus. The Historian contributes to the discussion some indifferent and irrelevant 'history'. The Theologian contributes nothing. He makes long speeches which are listened to, in presumably respectful silence, by the Lawyer and Philosopher, who then continue with their argument as though nothing had happened. It might almost seem that the Theologian is introduced to show that theology has nothing to say in the matter. The Scriptures contribute nothing to the argument. The only 'authority' in any sense recognized is that of the Corpus Juris.

The whole discussion is abstract in form and ancient or mythical history alone is used in illustration. No reference is made to the conditions of any particular country of the sixteenth century nor is there any sign that the author was preoccupied with the practical politics of any country. He exhibits a strong personal dislike of cruel punishments and public executions, and he shares the feelings and the views of Machiavelli about mercenary and national armies. He betrays, otherwise, no particular concern with any immediate and practical questions.

The argument is concerned with the right interpretation of the Lex Regia, that is with the nature of the delegation of sovereignty made by the people to the Prince. But it is not particularly concerned

____________________
1

Marii Salamonii Patritii Romani de Principatu. Libri Septem.

2
He was of course a Catholic and may have been a Jesuit. The book begins with a letter addressed to the Pope. There seems no reason to suppose that Marius Salamonius represents the author's real name.

-332-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A History of Political Thought in the Sixteenth Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 530

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.