A History of Political Thought in the Sixteenth Century

By J. W. Allen | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VII
THE DIVINE RIGHT OF KINGS

§ 1. INTRODUCTORY

THE theory of royal absolution expounded in the law schools of France under Francis I tended from the first to dissociate itself from the Corpus Juris and to substitute for a theory of delegation a conception of the King as holding his authority directly from God. This conception is the very essence of what is called the theory of the divine right of Kings. Whether it would have become predominant in France, but for the disturbance caused by the Huguenots and the disorganization, misery and ruin produced by the civil wars, is one of those questions on which speculation is vain. All we can say is that, but for the Huguenots, opposition to the Crown would have taken a 'constitutional' form simply and the King's claims would have been resisted only in the name of established custom or local privilege or on behalf of a claim to a share to sovereignty for the Estates or for the Parlements of the realm. In that case the struggle would more nearly have resembled that which was fought out in England in the next century. What would have been the issue in France it is not possible to say certainly. But it would probably have been impossible for the opposition to combine on any single point and against a divided opposition the Crown should have been assured of triumph in the long run. The fact really seems to be that only recognition of practically unlimited powers in the King could have given peace and order to France. If that were so, the recognition would have come. The permanent will to security would have won its usual victory and would have developed a theory to fit its exigences. It is possible even that, under such circumstances, the triumph of the monarchy would have been more rapid than actually it was, though this, certainly, is dubious. Certain it is, in any case, that Huguenots and factious and self-seeking grands seigneurs on both sides, between them drove France to find a refuge from chronic disorder in the recognition of the absolute authority of a sovereign will. It was the civil wars and the prospect of civil war interminable that made France royalist.

A 'Royalist', in the sense of a supporter of the Crown against

-367-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A History of Political Thought in the Sixteenth Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 530

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.