A History of Political Thought in the Sixteenth Century

By J. W. Allen | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTES
THE main purpose of these notes is to provide a list of the more important writings of the sixteenth century expressive or illustrative of political thought. There exists, of course, a great amount of many sorts of literature which expresses such thought incidentally or by implication only. The phraseology, too, of statutes edicts, proclamations, even of State papers and of course of private letters is often significant and indicative. But all this material, valuable as it is is so scattered and fragmentary, that no catalogue of it is practically possible. It is not easy to draw a line; but a line has to be drawn. ] have mentioned a few works containing collections of documents that ] have found useful.With all its limitations my list of sources of information on the politica thinking of the century is very far from complete. It includes only such writings as I have myself been able to make some use of; and, for various reasons, it does not include all of them.The modern literature bearing specifically or incidentally on the subject is very large in amount. Modern works are frequently referred to in the body of this book; but I have listed here only a few dealing with the thought of the period generally and have mentioned a few other which I have found indispensable. But completeness is here impracticable and discrimination almost impossible.
I. SOURCES
A. LUTHERANISM, CALVINISM, ETC. (To correspond with Part I of this book.)
ACONTIUS. Strategamata Satanae. 1565.
BEZA (Théodre de). De Haereticis. 1554.
CALVIN (Jean). Institutio. 1536-1560. All versions. The most importan are those of 1539-1541 and of 1559-1560.
Defensio orthodoxae fidei or Declaration pour maintenir la vraye foi. 1554
Prelectiones in librum prophetiarium Danielis. 1561.
Lettres Françaises. J. Bonnet. Paris. 1854.
CASTELLION (Sébastien). Preface to Latin Bible. 1551.
De Haereticis an sint persequendi or Traité des hérétiques. 1554.
Contra libellum Calvini. 1612. Written 1554.
Conseil à la France desolée. 1562.
Indispensable to the student of Castellion is F. Buisson Sébastien Casterlion, Sa vie et son oeuvre. 1892.
CELSI (Mino). In Haereticis coercendis quatenus progredi liceat. 1577. Republished 1584 as: De haereticis capitale supplicio non afficiendis.

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