Communist Activities among Aliens and National Groups: Hearings before the Subcommittee on Immigration and Naturalization of the Committee on the Judiciary, United States Senate, Eighty-First Congress, First Session, on S. 1832, a Bill to Amend the Immigration Act of October 16, 1918, as Amended

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APPENDIX I

STATEMENT OF HONORABLE PAT McCARRAN IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES, APRIL 25, 1949, UPON THE INTRODUCTION OF S. 1694.1

Mr. President, during the course of the last year and a half, a subcommittee of the Senate Committee on the Judiciary has been engaged in a comprehensive study of our entire immigration system. One facet of this study is an investigation of, the entrance of subversives into this country. There is in the custody of the subcommittee evidence, which establishes beyond a reasonable doubt, that there is extensive subversive activity being carried on in this country under the active direction and leadership of agents of foreign countries. This evidence is extensive, conclusive, and alarming. These agents supply the lifeblood for subversive activity in this country.

Although our present immigration laws provide for the exclusion and deportation of certain types of dangerous and subversive aliens, through the years these provisions have been made subject to a number of exceptions and provisos which have opened a backdoor for the admission into the United States of agents of foreign powers who enjoy a practical immunity from our laws. The administration of the legal mandates has frequently been lax and indecisive. By default, additional avenues of entry have been provided for otherwise excludable aliens.

This situation has been vastly complicated by the growth of numerous international organizations and commissions with headquarters or offices in this country and the resultant groups of aliens that have been permitted to enter the United States.

Our entire immigration system has been weakened to make it often impossible for our country to protect its security in this black era of fifth-column infiltration and cold warfare with the ruthless masters of the Kremlin.

We must make adequate provision to protect ourselves. We must bring our immigration system into line with the realities of Communist tactics.

The time has long since passed when we can afford to open our borders indiscriminately, to give unstinting hospitality to any person whose purpose, whose ideologic goal, is to overthrow our institutions and replace them with the evil oppression of totalitarianism.

We can no longer entertain with lavish hospitality or with amused indifference the sworn enemies of the United States.

I have today introduced a bill to revise our immigration laws in such a way as to place in the hands of the Government adequate powers to cope with the fifth-column tactics of international communism. The purpose of this bill is to plug the loopholes of the present law so that any alien--and I emphasize the word "any"--who engages in espionage or other subversive activity must be excluded or deported.

Let me emphasize in the beginning that this legislation will not in any way curb the legitimate activities of anyone, whether he be an immigrant, a visitor, a diplomat, or a delegate to an International organization.

This bill has only one purpose: To protect the people of the United States from any alien who abuses the traditional American hospitality by working for the overthrow of our Government. And, Mr. President, I mean any alien.

My bill is designed to sever the international lifeline which is feeding the Communist conspiracy in this country.

There is no obligation upon the United States--or for that matter upon any other nation--to harbor within its borders aliens who are working for its destruction. The duty to protect itself--the obligation to defend itself--against alien subversion is the fundamental responsibility of every government. We cannot continue to abdicate this duty.

Mr. President, I want to impress the members of the Senate with the earnestness with which I propose this measure. My proposal is based on a careful considera-

____________________
1
S. 1694 was superseded on May 11, 1949, by Senate bill 1832, introduced by Senator McCarran.

-A1-

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Communist Activities among Aliens and National Groups: Hearings before the Subcommittee on Immigration and Naturalization of the Committee on the Judiciary, United States Senate, Eighty-First Congress, First Session, on S. 1832, a Bill to Amend the Immigration Act of October 16, 1918, as Amended
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Appendix I A1
  • Appendix II A7
  • Appendix III A11
  • Appendix IV A43
  • Appendix V A73
  • Appendix VI A85
  • Appendix VII A111
  • Appendix VIII A193
  • Index A203
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