Communist Activities among Aliens and National Groups: Hearings before the Subcommittee on Immigration and Naturalization of the Committee on the Judiciary, United States Senate, Eighty-First Congress, First Session, on S. 1832, a Bill to Amend the Immigration Act of October 16, 1918, as Amended

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APPENDIX VIII

EXPERT FROM THE STATEMENT OF ROBERT C. ALEXANDER, ASSISTANT CHIEF, VISA DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF STATE

IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION

UNITED STATES SENATE, STAFF OF THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY, Washington, D. C., Thursday, July 15, 1948.

The staff of the subcommittee met at 10 a. m., pursuant to call, in the Senate District of Columbia Committee room, the Capitol, Thomas J. Davis, committee investigator, presiding.

Present: Thomas J. Davis; Richard Arens, staff director; Fred M. Mesmer, Investigator.

* * * * * * *

Mr. ARENS. Are there any other categories of persons coming into the United States by ruse, or trick, or fraud, that you can think of, which you think you ought to express yourself on?

We have talked about the persons who have come in ostensibly as visitors, but who are not visitors. We have talked about persons who have come in on transit certificates.

Now, are there any other categories of persons that you would like to express yourself on?

Mr. ALEXANDER Yes; there is another category that has given us considerable difficulty. That is what we call the international organization aliens. They are covered by the International Organizations Immunities Act of 1945. And those persons are coming to this country as nonimmigrants. They are not subject to exclusion under our laws, even though we may know that their coming here would not be in our best interests.

And the question has arisen as to whether or not we could refuse to receive them even if they have no documents to permit them to go to any other country, and whether we are not going to build up in this country within the next few years a large number of people who have no sympathy with us or our form of government, and yet who are brought into this country under cover of this International Organizations Immunities Act; and whom we can't get rid of, because no country will take them back.

It is not because they were not citizens of any foreign country when they come here, but the foreign country may say, "We don't want them back." So that ends it.

Mr. ARENS. To what extent is that practice being indulged in at the present time?

Mr. ALEXANDER.Well, it is to an alarming extent, I would say; to my mind, at least. Because every few days I see a case of that kind.

I think that the remedy for it, if you are getting to that, to that the international organization concerned should be required to assume responsibility for getting such a person out of this country when his purpose in coming is accomplished, or when they discharge him, or when he severs his connection with them, or when his period of employment is ended.

Mr. ARENS. Mr. Alexander, by the "international organisation" do you refer to the United Nations Organization?

Mr. ALEXANDER. Yes, and all of the others. The United Nations Organization, particularly, because they have a headquarters site here. Others because they hold meetings here.

Mr. ARENS. What is the extent of the problem? You have said, as I understand it, that it is a very great problem. Could you give us an estimate in the form of numbers as to the extent of the problem?

-A193-

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Communist Activities among Aliens and National Groups: Hearings before the Subcommittee on Immigration and Naturalization of the Committee on the Judiciary, United States Senate, Eighty-First Congress, First Session, on S. 1832, a Bill to Amend the Immigration Act of October 16, 1918, as Amended
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Appendix I A1
  • Appendix II A7
  • Appendix III A11
  • Appendix IV A43
  • Appendix V A73
  • Appendix VI A85
  • Appendix VII A111
  • Appendix VIII A193
  • Index A203
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