China after Seven Years of War

By Hawthorne Cheng; Samuel M. Chao et al. | Go to book overview

NEW HORIZONS FOR THE CHINESE WOMAN

By Jean Lyon

DURING Wen Ying-feng's first year in a cotton-spinning factory, the Japanese came from the east, and their advance threatened the city of Shasi in Hupeh, where she worked. The factory owners in Shasi decided to move upriver. They dismantled their machines, loaded them on river boats, and encouraged the workers to go along. Ying-feng decided to go. Her family, reluctant to move away from its little plot of land, stayed behind.

Ying-feng arrived in Chungking with the machines and started working the minute they were set up. She watched the factory grow into a fairly large establishment, with gardens and well groomed hedges and neat gravel paths, with solidly built brick buildings and with dugouts along the steep road leading up from the Chialing River roomy enough for all the workers during air raids. She saw the factory through three summers of heavy bombings by the Japanese, watched its destruction and its rebuilding.

There are no women riveters and welders in China, but there are women like Ying-feng, who work in spinning and weaving mills which make clothing for the army, women in at least one hand-grenade factory, women doing light work in the arsenals, and women in factories which make machines, metals, electrical equipment, and chemicals. The total number is not large, as man power for industry still is available; but the fact that women are in the factories at all is an indi-

-65-

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China after Seven Years of War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Illustrations viii
  • Contents ix
  • The War and the People 1
  • Chungking: City of Mud and Courage 31
  • Pishan: Portrait of a Small Town 56
  • New Horizons for the Chinese Woman 65
  • Man of the Plow and the Sword 78
  • Student Life in China 101
  • Wartime Chinese Literature 125
  • Progress Toward Constitutional Government 148
  • China's Life Line in the Air 167
  • Flying Under Two Flags 184
  • American "Know-How" for Chinese Soldiers 204
  • Chinese Courage in the Burma Jungles 213
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