China after Seven Years of War

By Hawthorne Cheng; Samuel M. Chao et al. | Go to book overview

CHINA'S LIFE LINE IN THE AIR

By Samuel M. Chao

JAMES DOOLITTLE was expecting a comfortable and uneventful trip on a CNAC plane from Chungking to India after his. audacious flight over Tokyo and a parachute landing in China.

The American army flyer expected the CNAC plane to make directly for India, knowing that Myitkyina, halfway station in northern Burma, was expected to fall at any hour. He found to his dismay that Captain Moon Chin was heading directly for the Burma city. Captain Chin explained that there were valuable lives and equipment to be saved. Doolittle had to depend upon Chin's judgment and CNAC's unfailing intelligence system.

They landed on the postage-stamp airport of Myitkyina amid the crack of rifle fire, with the Japs not far from the edge of the field. Moon Chin stripped the DC-3 of all its non- essential equipment, stowed aboard CNAC equipment and personnel and carefully picked his passengers from the thousands of refugees crowded on the field.

After Chin had more than fifty persons in the DC-3's twenty-one-passenger cabin Doolittle bluntly said, "I hope to hell you know what you're doing." Chin told him not to be excited. He had flown several times with more than fifty passengers, he said. Each one on board meant a life saved.

"We do lots of things here in this war we wouldn't do at home," said the Baltimore-born Chinese pilot.

When there were seventy-two milling and crying passen-

-167-

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China after Seven Years of War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Illustrations viii
  • Contents ix
  • The War and the People 1
  • Chungking: City of Mud and Courage 31
  • Pishan: Portrait of a Small Town 56
  • New Horizons for the Chinese Woman 65
  • Man of the Plow and the Sword 78
  • Student Life in China 101
  • Wartime Chinese Literature 125
  • Progress Toward Constitutional Government 148
  • China's Life Line in the Air 167
  • Flying Under Two Flags 184
  • American "Know-How" for Chinese Soldiers 204
  • Chinese Courage in the Burma Jungles 213
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