China after Seven Years of War

By Hawthorne Cheng; Samuel M. Chao et al. | Go to book overview

CHINESE COURAGE IN THE BURMA JUNGLES

By Hawthorne Cheng

"THE Chinese are the bravest soldiers I have ever seen," said Colonel Rothwell H. Brown. "With the little training they have had, I must take my hat off to them for what they have accomplished. They've got guts. I'm willing to go anywhere with them."

Colonel Brown, American commanding officer at the Forward Headquarters in northern Burma, was describing the Chinese forces fighting on that front to war correspondents.

These soldiers, sometimes referred to as Uncle Joe's Chinese boys, because Lieutenant General Joseph Stilwell commands them in his capacity as Chief of Staff to Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek, were retrained and equipped by Americans in India and are now fighting in the Burma jungles, through which they were forced to retreat two years ago.

In praising the Chinese soldiers, Colonel Brown had particularly in mind the first tank action in the Hukawng Valley, which made possible the Chinese-American victory in early March in the Maingkwan-Walawbum area, where more than two thousand Japanese were killed and wounded. The colonel, in command of the American engineering and maintenance personnel of the tanks, did much of the tactical planning in the Maingkwan-Walawbum battles.

The northern Burma jungles, where towering trees and entwining vines make progress difficult even for men on foot, are hardly an ideal terrain for tank maneuvers, but Colonel Brown had told Uncle Joe that tanks could fight there. The

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China after Seven Years of War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Illustrations viii
  • Contents ix
  • The War and the People 1
  • Chungking: City of Mud and Courage 31
  • Pishan: Portrait of a Small Town 56
  • New Horizons for the Chinese Woman 65
  • Man of the Plow and the Sword 78
  • Student Life in China 101
  • Wartime Chinese Literature 125
  • Progress Toward Constitutional Government 148
  • China's Life Line in the Air 167
  • Flying Under Two Flags 184
  • American "Know-How" for Chinese Soldiers 204
  • Chinese Courage in the Burma Jungles 213
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