The Missouri and North Arkansas Railroad Strike

By Orville Thrasher Gooden | Go to book overview

CHAPTER I
INTRODUCTION

THE Missouri and North Arkansas Railway, 365 miles in length, runs from Joplin, in the southwestern part of Missouri, to Helena, Arkansas, located on the Mississippi River about midway of the state north and south. Between Helena and Seligman, Missouri, and between Wayne and Neosho, Missouri, the road operates over its own tracks. Between Seligman and Wayne it operates over the Frisco tracks, and between Neosho and Joplin over the tracks of the Kansas City Southern.

From Seligman to Kensett, Arkansas, about two-thirds of the entire distance, the road winds its tortuous way through the Ozarks, skirting high cliffs and deep ravines, passing through tunnels, and here and there emerging into broad fertile valleys. Sharp curves and steep grades are frequent. To the east is the White River branch of the Missouri Pacific. Between the roads lie rugged hills that shut the two lines off from each other. The nearest points are eleven miles apart, Harrison on the M. & N. A. and Bergman on the Missouri Pacific. Far to the west is the Frisco, and to the southwest is the Kansas City-Little Rock branch of the Missouri Pacific. The way to the west is likewise broken by rugged ranges of hills, and thus a great area, estimated at 5, 394 square miles, with an almost pure Anglo-Saxon population of 145,000, is dependent upon the continuous operation of this winding mountain road. Throughout its entire length the road serves a population

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