The Missouri and North Arkansas Railroad Strike

By Orville Thrasher Gooden | Go to book overview

CHAPTERIV
HISTORY OF THE ROAD DURING SUSPENSION OF OPERATIONS

Some of the citizens felt that no road was better than a road with the friction and bitterness that had existed since the beginning of the strike. This sentiment was expressed by the following editotial:

Yes the M. & N. A. Railroad has closed down and let us hope and pray that it may be nailed down securely forever unless it can come back with peace and certainty.

The strife, turmoil and bitterness incident to the six months strike have become so esasperating that notwithstanding the millions of losses sustained by the people aling this railroad in case the raod is never resurrected, many are actually breathing a sigh of relief.1

The people were not lacking in efforts to find some way to restore service on the road. The first plan, even before the road closed down, was to lease the road from Leslie to Seligman. A meeting of citizens was held at Harrison and an effort made to raise $51,000 to keep the road in operation until some other plan could be worked out. Nothing came of this. The next move at Harrison was to approach the Missouri Pacific with a view to getting a stub built from Bergman, on the White River Branch, to Harrison. The country between is rough, and the Missouri Pacific already had several unprofitable short lines; so it turned a deaf ear to the proposition.

____________________
1
Qouted by Bradley and Russell, op. cit., p. 51, from the Boone County Headlight, August 4, 1921.

-63-

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