The Missouri and North Arkansas Railroad Strike

By Orville Thrasher Gooden | Go to book overview

CHAPTER V
HISTORY OF THE ROAD FROM MAY, 1922, TO JANUARY 15, 1923

IN the latter part of April work trains were out on the road, and in some instances passengers and freight were handled. It was not until May 1 that any sort of regular schedule was attempted, and then only from Seligman to Leslie. On May 4 a fertilizer train was operated out of Kensett toward Leslie. On May 14 traffic was resumed on the division from Leslie to Kensett.

It had been fifteen months since the strike of the shopmen, and nine months since the road had operated. Needless to say, roadbed and equipment were in wretched condition and service was for a time uncertain. In order to take care of the urgent needs of the farmers during the planting season, particularly in the matter of fertilizer, and to take care of the strawberry crop which promised to be heavy at some points, operations were resumed before adequate repairs could be made. In one instance a train was run from Harrison to Seligman, a distance of sixty-six miles, to move one car of strawberries.

During the strike, benefits were paid as follows: Dispatchers, $150 per month part of the time; Conductors, $60 per month; Engineers, $60 per month; Firemen, $60 per month; Trainmen, $60 per month; Shopmen, $7 per week for a time; Telegraphers, $60 per month; the Maintenance of Way men received some benefits but not much. The benefits of the Trainmen and the Engineers were raised to $100 per month in May, 1022, retroactive to January 1,

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