The Socialism of Our Times: A Symposium

By Harry W. Laidler; Norman Thomas | Go to book overview

CHAPTER III
LESSONS FROM THE LAST DECADE

By PAUL H. DOUGLAS

THE developments during the last decade in both capitalistic America and in bolshevistic Russia should compel a modification of socialistic theory and practice and lead to a consideration of other problems which have hitherto been slighted. If one may speak of the lessons which these crowded ten years should have taught, I would list the following as the most important, although not necessarily in the order named.


BREAKDOWN OF CAPITALISM NOT INEVITABLE

1. That Marx was wrong in Predicting an inevitable breakdown of capitalism from purely economic causes. The Marxian prediction of the cataclysm which was inevitably to result from the industrial reserve army, the increasing misery of the workers and increasingly catastrophic crises, was based primarily upon the labor theory of value and the tacit assumption that the quantity of variable capital (the amount expended in wages) would not increase as rapidly as the working population. As a matter of fact, however, the physical productivity per worker in American manufacturing has increased by about forty percent since 1919 and the real wages of the employed workers have gone up by no less than twenty-eight percent since 1914. Interestingly enough, Canada and the Scandinavian countries have enjoyed almost parallel increases. In countries which were not subject to the many strains of the World War, capitalism has, therefore, shown itself alert in improving the processes of production. Because of the com-

-29-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Socialism of Our Times: A Symposium
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 382

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.