Soviet Power and Policy

By George B. De Huszar | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 9
System of Controls

No analysis of the sources of Soviet power can be complete without examination and assessment of that element of the Soviet structure which is virtually its mainspring: the Soviet apparatus for the application of controls and discipline.* The Soviet political system can probably be more clearly differentiated from that of other governments by its system of controls than by any other means. As it works, so are Soviet aims and purposes achieved.


NATURE OF THE SYSTEM

No clear concept of the Soviet controls system can be gained without an understanding of the basis and nature of the Bolshevik revolution of 1917 and the development of the Soviet state thereafter. The revolution did not represent the true will of the Russian people in 1917. Their political desires, if anything so nebulous can be defined, were inclined toward a democracy similar to those of western Europe. Kerensky's regime preceding the Soviet seizure of power probably came very close to expressing the popular ideal. Unhappily, Kerensky tried to achieve this ideal too rapidly. The innate weaknesses of Western democracy

____________________
*
Adequate documentation, in the orthodox sense, of much of the material in this chapter is virtually impossible. The Soviet government is understandably silent on many points discussed; where official publications do exist, they are often highly suspect. Former Soviet officials who have decamped to the West and written books about their Soviet experiences are highly subjective in their writings and often have only limited knowledge. The author of this chapter has tried to assemble from this mass of not-too-reliable material what seems best to fit the over-all pattern of known facts. He has also supplemented this material with information gained through personal questioning of a number of Soviet nationals who have fled to western Europe since the end of World War II. As most of these sources were willing to give information only after assurance that their safety would not be jeopardized, they cannot be directly identified.

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Soviet Power and Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Authors ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Part One - Background of Soviet Power 1
  • Chapter 1 - The Success of Kremlin Policy 3
  • Notes to the Text 23
  • Selected Bibliography 24
  • Part Two - Soviet Power 27
  • Chapter 2 - Lands and Resources Lands 29
  • Notes to the Text 53
  • Selected Bibliography 53
  • Chapter 3 - Characteristics of the Population 55
  • Notes to the Text 76
  • Selected Bibliography 78
  • Chapter 4 - Economic Development 81
  • Notes to the Text 111
  • Selected Bibliography 112
  • Chapter 5 - Transportation 114
  • Notes to the Text 144
  • Selected Bibliography 146
  • Chapter 6 - Political and Administrative Structure 147
  • Notes to the Text 173
  • Selected Bibliography 173
  • Chapter 7 - Ideology 176
  • Notes to the Text 203
  • Selected Bibliography 203
  • Chapter 8 - Education 206
  • Notes to the Text 224
  • Selected Bibliography 225
  • Chapter 9 - System of Controls 228
  • Notes to the Text 264
  • Selected Bibliography 265
  • Chapter 10 - Armed Forces 268
  • Notes to the Text 300
  • Selected Bibliography 301
  • Chapter 11 - Communist Parties and the Communist International 303
  • Notes to the Text 332
  • Selected Bibliography 333
  • Chapter 12 - Foreign Trade The Organization of Foreign Trade 335
  • Notes to the Text 365
  • Selected Bibliography 366
  • Chapter 13 - Foreign Policy 370
  • Notes to the Text 390
  • Selected Bibliography 391
  • Part Three - Soviet Expansion in Eurasia 393
  • Chapter 14 - Strategy and Tactics of Expansion 395
  • Notes to the Text 416
  • Selected Bibliography 417
  • Chapter 15 - Western Europe 419
  • Notes to the Text 441
  • Selected Bibliography 441
  • Chapter 16 - Eastern Europe 444
  • Notes to the Text 464
  • Selected Bibliography 465
  • Chapter 17 - The Near and Middle East 468
  • Notes to the Text 493
  • Selected Bibliography 495
  • Chapter 18 - Southeast Asia 498
  • Notes to the Text 532
  • Selected Bibliography 533
  • Chapter 19 - Northeast Asia 536
  • Notes to the Text 562
  • Selected Bibliography 563
  • Part Four - The Sovíet Uníon and the United States 565
  • Chapter 20 - Geopolitical Positions 567
  • Notes to the Text 586
  • Selected Bibliography 587
  • Index 589
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