Soviet Power and Policy

By George B. De Huszar | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 10
Armed Forces

One of the lessons which most statesmen have learned about international affairs during the present century is that the problem of national security is more complex than merely providing protection from the threat of armed attack. It has become increasingly clear that the political and social institutions of a nation also may be threatened by economic, psychological, or ideological forces originating outside its borders. This realization has caused the powers to bring their security forces into a closer liaison with the executive offices which direct foreign policy and manage the internal affairs that are vulnerable to international forces.

In the U.S.S.R., unity of purpose and the integration of military with civil affairs is accomplished through the totalitarian control exercised by the Communist Party. Most of the military leaders are Communists and all of the High Command are connected with the highest party organs. For more than ten years Stalin, as Secretary-General of the Communist Party, Chairman of the Council of Ministers, and Commander-in-Chief of the armed forces, personified the complete fusion of party, bureaucratic, and military might. No one person now appears to occupy this position. However, members of the Communist Party Presidium exercise such control collectively. From this it follows that the government of the Soviet Union provides the necessary coordination in the formulation of foreign, domestic, and military policies which national security requires.

Although national security is dependent on other factors, ultimately it rests on military power. Military power involves more than the current strength of a nation's armed forces; it is a measure of the effective combat strength which a nation can exert and maintain for an indefinite period. This in turn depends upon the size and capabilities of the population; the ability to mobilize efficiently for military, industrial, and general defense purposes; the extent and degree of development of national

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Soviet Power and Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Authors ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Part One - Background of Soviet Power 1
  • Chapter 1 - The Success of Kremlin Policy 3
  • Notes to the Text 23
  • Selected Bibliography 24
  • Part Two - Soviet Power 27
  • Chapter 2 - Lands and Resources Lands 29
  • Notes to the Text 53
  • Selected Bibliography 53
  • Chapter 3 - Characteristics of the Population 55
  • Notes to the Text 76
  • Selected Bibliography 78
  • Chapter 4 - Economic Development 81
  • Notes to the Text 111
  • Selected Bibliography 112
  • Chapter 5 - Transportation 114
  • Notes to the Text 144
  • Selected Bibliography 146
  • Chapter 6 - Political and Administrative Structure 147
  • Notes to the Text 173
  • Selected Bibliography 173
  • Chapter 7 - Ideology 176
  • Notes to the Text 203
  • Selected Bibliography 203
  • Chapter 8 - Education 206
  • Notes to the Text 224
  • Selected Bibliography 225
  • Chapter 9 - System of Controls 228
  • Notes to the Text 264
  • Selected Bibliography 265
  • Chapter 10 - Armed Forces 268
  • Notes to the Text 300
  • Selected Bibliography 301
  • Chapter 11 - Communist Parties and the Communist International 303
  • Notes to the Text 332
  • Selected Bibliography 333
  • Chapter 12 - Foreign Trade The Organization of Foreign Trade 335
  • Notes to the Text 365
  • Selected Bibliography 366
  • Chapter 13 - Foreign Policy 370
  • Notes to the Text 390
  • Selected Bibliography 391
  • Part Three - Soviet Expansion in Eurasia 393
  • Chapter 14 - Strategy and Tactics of Expansion 395
  • Notes to the Text 416
  • Selected Bibliography 417
  • Chapter 15 - Western Europe 419
  • Notes to the Text 441
  • Selected Bibliography 441
  • Chapter 16 - Eastern Europe 444
  • Notes to the Text 464
  • Selected Bibliography 465
  • Chapter 17 - The Near and Middle East 468
  • Notes to the Text 493
  • Selected Bibliography 495
  • Chapter 18 - Southeast Asia 498
  • Notes to the Text 532
  • Selected Bibliography 533
  • Chapter 19 - Northeast Asia 536
  • Notes to the Text 562
  • Selected Bibliography 563
  • Part Four - The Sovíet Uníon and the United States 565
  • Chapter 20 - Geopolitical Positions 567
  • Notes to the Text 586
  • Selected Bibliography 587
  • Index 589
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