of basaltic lava were poured forth from Jorullo, these including fragments of granitic rock. The ejection did not cease until February, 1760. Twenty years later the lava was still hot enough, a few inches below the surface, to light a cigar. This eruption, too, was preceded by earthquakes and subterranean rumblings, which began in the June preceding. There has been no eruption in this region since.

Camiguin. -- This volcano also started from a fissure in a level plain on one of the small islands north of Luzon in the Philippines. Beginning in 1871, it continued to be active for four years, by which time it had reached a height of about 1800 feet.

FIG. 55. -- The volcanic eruption which formed Sabrina Island in the Azores, June 13, 1811. (After De La Beche.)

Sabrina Island. -- This submarine volcanic cone appeared above the waters of the Atlantic in the Azores group, off the coast of St. Michaels, on June 13, 1811, and rose to a height of about 300 feet above the sea, gaining a circumference of about a mile. Being, however, largely made of unconsolidated material, it has since been washed away again. As observed from the nearest cliff on St. Michaels, the explosions resembled a mixed discharge of cannon and musketry and were accompanied by a great abundance of lightning. The appearance of the eruption above water is shown in the accompanying figure from a sketch made at that time (Fig. 55).

Graham Island (Isle Julia). -- This island, which existed for only about three months, rose as a submarine cinder cone in 1831 in the Mediterranean between the southwest coast of Sicily and that projecting part of the African coast where ancient Carthage stood. A few years before the appearance of the island, soundings at this locality showed a depth of water of 100 fathoms. Premonitory shocks were felt on June 28 over the spot and on the adjoining

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