Verbal Protocols of Reading: The Nature of Constructively Responsive Reading

By Michael Pressley; Peter Afflerbach | Go to book overview

3
What Readers Can Do When They Read: A Summary of the Results from the On-Line Self-Report Studies of Reading

Three overarching types of activities were evident in the self-reports that we analyzed. First, a great deal of activity was in the service of constructing the meaning of the text. Some of this occurred before and some after reading, although the overwhelming majority of this activity occurred during reading ( Levin & Pressley, 1981). Although there was more evidence of readers attempting to comprehend and learn from text than other processes, comprehension and learning were reported as regulated in part by monitoring activities. There was a great deal of evidence across the many self-reports that readers are aware of many different aspects of the reading process, with awareness affecting both strategies that were elected to cope with coming to understand text and evaluations that readers made of the text. In fact, readers' prior knowledge that could be related to text content was most apparent from reports of readers evaluating the text they were reading. Just as comprehension and monitoring are complex and multidimensional, so it is with evaluating. Many different types of evaluations stimulated by different characteristics of text were reported in the studies we reviewed. Finally, we found that the three activities of constructing meaning, monitoring, and evaluating were all influenced by the sociocultural context in which they occurred. The social nature of reading resonated throughout the accounts of these activities, despite the fact that the majority of studies did not have a specific focus on the social aspects of reading.

As we knew was the case from informal reading of the papers studied in our review, some studies were more complete in the processes they reported than others. The completeness of a report can be gauged roughly by the frequency of its mention in the results that follow. In particular, strategies, monitoring, and

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