Managerial Ethics: Moral Management of People and Processes

By Marshall Schminke | Go to book overview

or management theory and research and equally often produce sound ethics theory and research. However, we seldom produce work that integrates fully -- at both empirical and theoretical levels -- what we know about business, management, and ethics.

Clearly, this critique of our field is neither original nor unique to this book. Calls for theory integration have been common, but like the weather, we have talked about it at length but have not been very successful at doing much about it. The point of this volume is to take an important step in that direction, to initiate conversations, and to provide some models for thinking about how to integrate more fully our thinking about business ethics.

As a result, this volume may raise more questions than it answers. I hope that is true. Furthermore, it remains to be seen how effective this volume will be in its mission of cultivating new conversations about business ethics. The simple act of creating this work has already led to nearly a dozen new proposals with and between the contributing authors of this volume! However, the real test lies not with these writers -- they already shared my view that integration is necessary and useful -- but with the readers. Will these chapters foster more integrative, more creative ways of linking management and ethics research among management and ethics researchers? I hope so.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

No project like this can be successfully concluded without an abundance of work, advice, and support from a number of fronts. First, I thank the editorial team and staff at Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Before meeting these good people, the ideas in this book were just that: ideas. They have provided unbounded professionalism and invaluable guidance at every step of the process. Second, I thank Creighton University and its College of Business Administration for supporting this project and I thank my Creighton colleagues for supporting me through this project (especially during those times when my preoccupation with it pulled me away from my local duties!). Finally, my deepest thanks and gratitude to those who labored so hard to contribute the chapters that follow. To a person, they were insightful, creative, responsive, and just generally good souls. I could not have hoped for a more pleasurable editing experience than I had with this stellar group. I learned much from working with each one of them and even more from each final contribution. I hope the reader does as well.

-- Marshall Schminke

-viii-

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