Frontiers of Medicine: A History of Medical Education and Research at the University of Alberta

By Elise A. Corbet | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 6
Medical Education

History of medical education in Canada: undergraduate, graduate and continuing medical education at the University of Alberta

IN 1968, a symposium on the history of medical education took place at the University of California in Los Angeles. Even though it was a time of intense scrutiny and revision for medical education, the first conclusion reached by the symposium was that "the present concern with medical education ... and methods of teaching do not represent a solely modern phenomenon. The problem has existed from the time of medicine's origin." 1 More recent controversies can be traced in certain key analyses. Philippe Pinel wrote an essay in 1793 on the clinical training of physicians in France, where medical education was undergoing radical changes. 2 Sir William Osler addressed the medical faculty at McGill University in 1895 on the subject "Teaching and Thinking: The Two Functions of a Medical School," and discussed the dramatic changes taking place, including incorporation of medical education into university programmes. 3 In 1920, J.J.R. Macleod, of insulin fame, wrote: "there has been for some years a feeling among the medical profession that all is not well with the stereotyped medical college curriculum."4 An editorial in the January 1933 issue of the Canadian Medical Association Journal, bearing the title "The Problem of Medical Education," represented similar titles found in any given year in this or any other medical journal of the period. This particular editorial referred to a series of contemporary articles published in "The Lancet", the publication of the British Medical Association, under the general heading

-138-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Frontiers of Medicine: A History of Medical Education and Research at the University of Alberta
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 254

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.