The House at Otowi Bridge: The Story of Edith Warner and Los Alamos

By Peggy Pond Church | Go to book overview

FOUR

"I am not, and never have been, the guiding hand in my life," Edith writes in the first of her Christmas letters. "Something--what, I do not venture to say--has prevented what I thought I wanted to do and pushed me into what I eventually did."

In the spring of her first year in New Mexico the Boyds gave up the guest ranch in Frijoles and moved to an unsettled valley high in the Jemez Mountains. Restless adventurer that he was, John Boyd could never contentedly stay long in one place. His wife thought wistfully of the comfortable farm life in Indiana where they had lived in the first years of their marriage. She was a friendly woman who found the greatest delight in church socials and busy neighboring, but she adored her husband and followed him from one lonely place in New Mexico to another throughout his life. It was Martha Boyd who taught Edith Warner what women who must cope with daily living on the edge of a wilderness need to know. During her four months at Frijoles the Boyds became to her like second parents, and when they left the canyon they took her with them.

The last lap of the two-day journey was made in a wagon. For a while they slept in tents at the edge of a little clearing surrounded by fir and aspen. Then they built a log cabin with a corral beside it. Water had to be carried in buckets across a narrow footbridge from a spring on the opposite side of the ice-cold stream. The women wrestled with an old cookstove and an uncertain supply of wood that burned stubbornly. Long-range planning and ingenuity were required to feed the hungry men who worked all day cutting and hauling logs for the new buildings and laying them in place. Food was shipped from Santa Fe to the old siding at Buckman by freight,

-26-

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The House at Otowi Bridge: The Story of Edith Warner and Los Alamos
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Foreword 1
  • One 6
  • Two 12
  • Three 20
  • Four 26
  • Five 29
  • Six 32
  • Seven 36
  • Eight 42
  • Nine 54
  • Ten 64
  • Eleven 76
  • Twelve 80
  • Thirteen 85
  • Fourteen 91
  • Fifteen 100
  • Sixteen 105
  • Eighteen 113
  • Appendix 119
  • L'Envoi 147
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