Language and Languages: An Introduction to Linguistics

By Willem L. Graff | Go to book overview

CHAPTER II
MEANING

MEANING IN GENERAL

Approaches to the Study of Meaning

The study of the nature of meaning in language has been unduly neglected, to the detriment of a clear understanding of what language is. Attempts at a definition have not been lacking, but because they were prompted by and based upon preconceived theories in the realm either of logic or of psychology, they naturally had no more than transitory value. To consider meanings as mere forms of thought, subject to logical analysis and definition, is nothing short of hypostatizing mental abstractions and transferring them into the field of language. Intrinsic properties of things and events, logically arrived at, are not expressed by or contained in words, nor are meanings independent entities existing in a logical world and obeying laws of their own. Psychologists have devised an elaborate terminology with the hope of giving an account of the "process" of meaning in terms of impressions, images, concepts, and their apperception, association, assimilation, complication, etc. No doubt psychological theories have contributed greatly to the understanding and formulation of our conscious and subconscious states and activities. Nevertheless the very process of meaning remains a mystery to which the key has not yet been found. However disconcerting this may be, it is more so for the psychologist than for the linguist. The student of language as such is only indirectly concerned with the psychic processes themselves; he is more

-71-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Language and Languages: An Introduction to Linguistics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • Illustrations xxiii
  • Abbreviations xxv
  • Phonetic and Other Symbols xxvii
  • Glossary xxxi
  • Part I - Constituents and Mechanism 1
  • Chapter I - The Phonetic Element in Language 3
  • Chapter II - Meaning 71
  • Chapter III - Units of Signification 94
  • Chapter IV - Accentuation 161
  • Chapter V - Categorizing in Language 186
  • Part II - Drift and Diversification 213
  • Chapter VI - Phonetic Change 215
  • Chapter VII - Causes of Phonetic and Linguistic Change 258
  • Chapter VIII - Changes Involving Meaning 277
  • Chapter IX - Principles of Language Classification 319
  • Chapter X - The Indo-European Family 352
  • Chapter XI - The Non-Indo-European Languages 397
  • Index 473
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 492

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.