Russia at the Barricades: Eyewitness Accounts of the August 1991 Coup

By Victoria E. Bonnell; Ann Cooper et al. | Go to book overview

LAUREN G.LEIGHTON


4 Moscow: The Morning of August 21

Lauren G. Leighton, who teaches Russian literature at the University of Illinois at Chicago, is the author of many scholarly works, essays, and translations. He lived in Russia during most of the two years preceding the coup and in 1991-92 was a Fulbright Exchange Teacher at the Moscow Pedagogical University.

I was in the orchard taking a lukewarm shower in a cold rain at the dacha near Kharkov, in Ukraine, when the Emergency Committee made its now well-known statement that it had taken power. The voice over the radio sounded like it is supposed to sound at such a moment: spooky, without human quality, distanced, ominous. It had the Party Old Guard ring of a lie to it--not the words themselves, but the presumptive ease with which the Old Guard lies for its view of history. My wife, her father, and I immediately decided to return to Moscow, not out of any sense of apprehension, but because we knew that the future would be decided there and we wanted to see it.

When we arrived in Moscow we got a glimpse of tanks near the Kremlin and passed a standing column of armored troop carriers on our way home, but the city seemed calm and our taxi driver reported that most of the city had not reacted. Life also continued as usual in our neighborhood, and I saw no signs of military control when I walked down to look at the Ostankino television center. Radio Free Europe reported resistance, but the impression we received was that people had not reacted. So far as we could tell throughout the remainder of August 20, the putschists seemed to be in control; we had plenty of time to decide what, if anything, we could do.

-100-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Russia at the Barricades: Eyewitness Accounts of the August 1991 Coup
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 374

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.