The Positive Psychology of Buddhism and Yoga: Paths to a Mature Happiness

By Marvin Levine | Go to book overview

deep-seated conviction is that the intellectual framework of Buddhism and Yoga is congenial with what I call the Western scientific worldview, particularly with the view within Western psychology of both human nature and the human circumstance. This relation between East and West is, indeed, one of the theses of this book. Throughout the Buddhism and Yoga sections, at the end of the chapters, I have added what I call supplements. These are typically signaled by three asterisks. These supplements describe aspects of Western psychology that relate to the material in that chapter. There are, however, relevant developments in contemporary clinical psychology so extensive and so worthy of detailed treatment, that I have added this extended supplementary section. It continues the demonstration of how some of the methods of Western psychology coordinate well with Eastern ideas.

The fourth part is on handling anger. The central lesson of the first three sections is that one can improve one's life by changing one's self. This fourth section applies this lesson and the methods of the three preceding sections to this specific area, to handling one's own anger. This topic is not only important in its own right but can serve as a model for changing other facets of ourselves.

It is commonplace to refer to a book as a joumey. This book describes a path and invites the reader to start making progress on that path.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I am grateful to many people who influenced the writing of this book. My wife, Mara, first encouraged me to undertake the project, and patiently applied her substantial writing talents to editing the successive drafts; Sung-Bae Park, a colleague at Stony Brook and a Korean Buddhist practitioner, also encouraged me, suggesting that Western psychology was an excellent way for Buddhism to come to America; Fred Levine, a friend and colleague in psychology, continually challenged me with his insightful questions; my many students over the years frequently stimulated and corrected my thinking; and prepublication reviewers, recruited by the publisher, made several useful sug

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