The Positive Psychology of Buddhism and Yoga: Paths to a Mature Happiness

By Marvin Levine | Go to book overview

25
Yogic Theory: The Enlightened Mind

Chapter 22 contained the description, summarized in Fig. 22.1, of the pre- or un-enlightened mind. At that extreme, mental activity is dominated by the cravings and conditioned belief systems. These influence and distort the more anterior processes -- planful thinking, creativity, and speech. Still deeper psychological processes, those of Purusha, are non-functional. There is no witnessing, reflecting on or transforming any of the mental activities. In the unenlightened mind these mental activities proceed uninspected and unquestioned.

Chapters 22 and 23 presented the methods of change, the eight angas. The first two angas, the Yamas and Niyamas, foster the development of a new set of attitudes. The other angas, the asanas, pranic practices, and meditation, help one attain to deeper levels of immersion. According to yogic theory, these various methods serve to calm and clear the mind, and to realize the complex of activities that we refer to as Purusha. These effects, which characterize the enlightened mind, are illustrated in Fig. 25.1.

As with Fig. 22.1, information is shown coming in from the left. It impacts now on a very different configuration. First, the passions (A

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