Pathways through Adolescence: Individual Development in Relation to Social Contexts

By Lisa J. Crockett; Ann C. Crouter | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FOURTEEN
Commentary: On Developmental Pathways and Social Contexts in Adolescence

Laurence Steinberg Temple University

The chapters in this volume may be viewed as a collective representation of our thinking about the study of adolescent development in the 1990s. Although the various authors approach the study of adolescence from different theoretical perspectives, and with an eye toward explaining different phenomena, each of the chapters shares two concerns: (a) an interest in studying adolescent development within the broader ecology in which young people come of age (hence the emphasis on context throughout the volume); and (b) an interest in looking at adolescence not as a discontinuous period, but as inherently linked to what precedes and follows it developmentally (hence the emphasis on pathways). The first theme reflects the profound influence of Bronfenbrenner ( 1979) and other human ecologists on the study of adolescence. The second theme reflects the important contributions of life-span developmentalists (e.g., Hetherington & Baltes, 1988).

In some regards, the chapters considered together illustrate how much the field of adolescent development has changed in the past several decades. Today, most students of adolescence take for granted the contextualistic, life-span bent represented in this volume. But it is important to remember that, even as recently as 20 years ago, neither the ecological nor the life-span approach was especially influential in the study of adolescence. Until the late 1970s, the dominant paradigms in the study of adolescence were traditional psychological paradigms that deemphasized, if not outright ignored, the social context of the period, and drew firm boundaries around adolescence as a developmental stage best studied in isolation from childhood or adulthood.

-245-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Pathways through Adolescence: Individual Development in Relation to Social Contexts
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 273

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.