Russia at the Barricades: Eyewitness Accounts of the August 1991 Coup

By Victoria E. Bonnell; Ann Cooper et al. | Go to book overview

ANN COOPER


3 The Foreign Press and the Coup

Ann Cooper reported from Moscow for National Public Radio from 1986 through 1991.

"Boy, have I got bad news," announced my husband, Bill Keller, when I answered his phone call from Moscow. It was early morning, August 19, 1991, and I was still in my room at the Hotel Lietuva in Vilnius.

For Moscow correspondents, August was normally a welcome respite from the crush of political news. Kremlin leaders went off to their Black Sea beach resorts, and foreign correspondents could safely leave for their own vacations--or for business trips, like the one I was on to gather material for a retrospective piece about Lithuania's independence campaign.

Bill quickly described the announcement of Gorbachev's phony illness and the membership of the ominous State of Emergency Committee.

"This is not a joke," he concluded, knowing that I might need a little convincing after living through several years of rumors and false alarms about conservative plots to oust Mikhail Gorbachev.

We talked briefly about the crudeness of the scheme. The goal was obvious: Gennadii Yanaev and his fellow thugs, relics of the Soviet past, wanted to reverse the breathtaking transformations of the Gorbachev era and preserve their own cozy world of power. Their use of the absurd "Gorbachev is sick" story, and their appeals to a false Soviet patriotism, indicated how thoroughly out of touch they were. The lies of the past were no longer calmly accepted by an obedient society; indeed, it seemed to us that the putchisty, as the coup plotters came to be known in Russian, would need an unthinkable amount of force to impose their will on a public now accustomed to speaking its own mind.

-308-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Russia at the Barricades: Eyewitness Accounts of the August 1991 Coup
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 374

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.