The Dark Side of Interpersonal Communication

By William R. Cupach; Brian H. Spitzberg | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 10
PRIVACY BINDS IN FAMILY INTERACTIONS: THE CASE OF PARENTAL PRIVACY INVASION

Sandra Petronio Arizona State University

To some, the notion of family privacy seems to be an oxymoron. But, as scholars like Berardo ( 1974) and Karpel ( 1980) have indicated, privacy provides important functions for family members. For example, privacy helps protect family members from outside scrutiny or gives the members a chance to try out arguments on each other without risk of humiliation. Clearly, knowing that information will be kept secure is comforting. Yet, there is more to the concept of family privacy than the issue of protection from outsiders. Understanding family privacy entails focusing on the way members manage privacy issues within the family as well as with nonfamily members. Within the family, members define territory, possessions, and information as belonging to them collectively, between certain members, or to individual members alone ( Altman, 1975; Karpel, 1980). In order to maintain privacy within the family unit, ownership recognition of space, information, and possessions by the members is necessary ( Petronio, 1991). One complicated task is determining when space, possessions, or information belongs to one or more of the members. For example, if information belongs to just one person, he or she has the right to protect the privacy of that information. If it belongs to more than one family member, those involved need to negotiate the rules for how the information is kept private or revealed. As families grow, communication increases about who has the right to control certain space, possessions, and information ( Wolfe & Laufer, 1974). These interactions are an attempt to manage privacy rights internally within the family structure.

For the most part, the attempts to manage privacy within the family are

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The Dark Side of Interpersonal Communication
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • References ix
  • PART I - Shades of Darkness in Interpersonal Relations 1
  • Chapter 1 - Stratagems, Spoils, and a Serpent's Tooth: On the Delights and Dilemmas of Personal Relationships 3
  • Acknowledgments 20
  • References 20
  • Chapter 2 - The Dark Side of (in) Competence 25
  • References 41
  • PART II - The Maze of Messages 51
  • Chapter 3 - Messages that Hurt 53
  • Acknowledgments 78
  • References 78
  • Chapter 4 - Patterns of Interational Paradoxes 83
  • References 100
  • Chapter 5 - Equivocations as an Interactional Event 105
  • References 122
  • PART III - The Face Beneath the Masks 125
  • Chapter 6 - Conversational Dilemmas 127
  • References 157
  • Chapter 7 - Social Predicaments 159
  • References 176
  • Chapter 8 - Deception 181
  • Acknowledgments 211
  • References 211
  • PART IV - Relational Webs 215
  • Chapter 9 - Relational Transgressions 217
  • References 238
  • Chapter 10 - Privacy Binds in Family Interactions: The Case of Parental Privacy Invasion 241
  • References 256
  • Chapter 11 - The Dark Side of "Normal" Family Interaction 259
  • References 276
  • Chapter 12 - Physical and Psychological Abuse 281
  • References 306
  • PART V - Fetching Good out of Evil 313
  • Chapter 13 - Dark Side Dénouement 315
  • References 319
  • AUTHOR INDEX 321
  • SUBJECT INDEX 335
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