Issues in Educating Students with Disabilities

By Edward J. Kameenui; David Chard et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 2
ATTENTION DEFICIT DISORDERS

Janet W. Lerner Northeastern Illinois University

Attention deficit disorder (ADD) is a relatively new diagnostic label for children. ADD constitutes a chronic neurobiological condition characterized by developmentally inappropriate attention skills, impulsivity, and, in some cases, hyperactivity ( Barkley, 1990). The term is used by many professionals, such as the U.S. Department of Education ( 1991), to identify these children. An alternative diagnostic term is recommended by the American Psychiatric Association ( 1994) -- namely, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) -- and this referent is used in the DSM-IV ( Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed.). In practice, both ADD and ADHD describe the same disability and are frequently used interchangeably ( Rief, 1993). Even though the designations ADD and ADHD are relatively recent, children with the characteristics of ADD have long been recognized and posed a challenge for parents, psychologists, educators, and physicians.

The suspicion that many Americans seem to have ADD may be true. One can speculate that as Americans we inherited the genetic characteristics of our impulsive, hyperactive risk-taking ancestors. After all, we are the descendants of people who made the rash, high-risk decision to leave their native countries and families to start life anew in America. Their peers and family members who remained in the "old country" were the attentive, reflective, conservative people who did not choose to take that impetuous trio to the new world.

-27-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Issues in Educating Students with Disabilities
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 409

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.