Issues in Educating Students with Disabilities

By Edward J. Kameenui; David Chard et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 19
EDUCATING STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: THE FUTURE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION

Naomi Zigmond University of Pittsburgh

This volume has addressed many issues of great importance to the education of students with disabilities, namely: Who has a disability? What do we need to know to plan and monitor instruction for students with disabilities? What assessments do we need to do to find that out? What are appropriate instructional models for students with disabilities? What special attention should be provided to particular groups of students with disabilities? Where do we go from here, in legislation, in policy, in research, and in practice?

In this text, chapters by Kavale, Forness, Lerner, and Speece and Harry have tackled problems relating to the definition of disability: Who is learning disabled? Who is to be classified as emotionally disturbed or behavior disordered? Who has attention deficit disorder? How can classification schemes utilized in the schools serve, rather than stigmatize, both children and their families? Chapters by Howell and Davidson, Deno, and Haager and Vaughn have addressed the what and how of assessment; the chapter by Tankersley and Landrum described the problems in assessment when issues of comorbidity are considered. Englemann as well as Stevens and Salisbury discussed approaches to schooling that improve the overall quality of mainstream instruction and address the heterogeneity currently existing in classrooms whether students with disabilities are included or not. The chapter by Rosenshine summarized advances in instructional research that can and should be used to guide teaching and learning in the general education classrooms. In the chapter by Graham and Harris, the authors searched for and found sensible, common ground in the sometimes contentious debate

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