Theory and Theology in George Herbert's Poetry: Divinitie, and Poesie, Met

By Elizabeth Clarke | Go to book overview

3
'Ejaculations' and the Poetry of the Psalms: Herbert's Role as Contemporary Psalmist

In the last chapter I argued for a particular kind of relationship between Herbert and the European devotional tradition which François de Sales' rhetorical spirituality represents, suggesting that Herbert knew this Continental poetics, and even experimented with it, but felt the need to separate his lyrics from the excesses of Counter-Reformation piety and rhetoric. After the Council of Trent Counter-Reformation poets concentrated on producing a poetry of the senses in order to manipulate the emotions of the reader. François de Sales is writing at the height of the fashion for the utile-doux, consciously appropriating the 'dépouilles d'Égypte' in the form of rhetorical sweetness, for an audience with literary taste.1 The 'mildness' noted by Martz is as much a feature of the rhetoric of An Introduction to the Devoute Life as of its theology. Both aim to create a serene space in which the imagination can work to bring the Christian into the presence of God. François de Sales' purpose is to incite the emotion appropriate to devotion, from a controlled basis of serenity. His language for the detachment from violent emotion emphasizes strongly the sense of a delineated place in which the presence of God operates:

Examin often every day, at least morning & evening, whether thy soule be in thy hands, or some passion of unquietnes hath robbed thee of it. Consider whether thou have thy hart at commandement, whether it be not escaped and fled away from thee, to some unrulie affection of love, hatred, envie, covetousnes, feare, ioye, sadnes: and yf it be wandred astray, seek it out presently, and bring it back againe gentlie to the presence of God.2

____________________
1
See Ch. 2 n. 12.
2
Francis de Sales, An Introduction to the Dovoute Life tr. I. Y. (Douai, 1613), p. iv, p. 45 (pagination starts again from the beginning of p. iv).

-127-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Theory and Theology in George Herbert's Poetry: Divinitie, and Poesie, Met
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 306

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.