Economic Botany: A Textbook of Useful Plants and Plant Products

By Albert F. Hill | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIX
TROPICAL FRUITS

The number of edible tropical fruits is legion. Thousands of them are used daily by the native peoples, and most of these are unknown to the white man. There are 250 edible fruits in the Philippine Islands alone. Sooner or later the people of the United States as well as of other temperate regions will have to turn to a greater extent to the tropics to supplement their own food resources, and fruits are among the best products that the tropics have to offer. Improved methods of transportation will make it possible to use fruits actually grown in the tropics, while Florida and California have a climate favorable to the cultivation of many tropical species. Several tropical fruits have already been exploited. The banana and pineapple are now as familiar as the apple and pear, and citrus fruits are known the world over. In comparison with the fruits of temperate regions, tropical fruits have been much neglected horticulturally and few improvements have been made over the wild product. This condition is now being remedied and with the use of scientific methods of fruit growing the products of the tropics should be all the more valuable. While edible fruits occur in a vast number of families, they are particularly important in the Anacardiaccae, Annonaceac, Myrtaceae, Rutaceae, Sapotaceae, and Sapindaceae. Of these the Rutaceae is the best known and most important, for it is the source of the citrus fruits.


CITRUS FRUITS

The citrus fruits were domesticated from wild ancestors in Eastern and Southern Asia in very early time. Some of them have been cultivated for over 3000 years. They were sometimes grown for other purposes than eating. Citron, for example, was planted in the famous Hanging Gardens of Babylon for use in toilet water and pomades. These fruits were early introduced into the Mediterranean region, where they have always been an important crop. As many as 100 species of Citrus have been described, many of which are probably of hybrid origin. Only a few, however, are of commercial importance.

The citrus fruits are thorny aromatic shrubs or small trees. The leathery evergreen leaves are glandular dotted and, although they appear to be simple, are actually unifoliate-compound leaves with a joint between the leaf blade and stalk. The white or purplish flowers are solitary, but produced in great profusion, and often very fragrant. The

-406-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Economic Botany: A Textbook of Useful Plants and Plant Products
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 560

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.