After Homicide: Practical and Political Responses to Bereavement

By Paul E. Rock | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

Empirical research incurs debts. This book could not have been written without the generosity of the principals whose lives and actions it describes, and I am deeply grateful to them for their patience, kindness and candour in talking to me, often more than once and at length, and for giving me access to papers and meetings. I would like especially to thank Helen Peggs, Helen Reeves and Ann Viney of Victim Support; Jane Cooper, the first co-ordinator of SAMM, and successive chairmen of SAMM, David Howden, Frank Green, Ron Rodgers and John Davis; Ann Robinson and June Patient, the co-founders of POMC; Joan Bacon, Pat Green, Derek Rogers, Sandra Sullivan and Ann Virgin of Justice for Victims; Ian Chisholm and Christine Stewart of the Home Office; Andrew Puddephatt of Liberty; Jillian Tallon of TCF; Jayne Zito of The Zito Trust, and all the other people whose names will appear in the text that follows.

Those voices would have been mute had it not been for the work of transcribing hours of interview tapes, and I am grateful to Amanda Francis, Elaine Meagher and Seeta Persaud for performing that unthankful job. I am grateful to David Driver for giving me access to the library of The Times; to Glennys Howarth for introducing me to the burgeoning writting on death and bereavement on which she is so expert; to Colin Scott, Michael Zander and Lucia Zedner for helpful advice about legal rights; to Helen Peggs for advice about the mass media's treatment of victim issues; to Coline Covington for guidance about Jung's conception of the shadow; to Andri Soteri for carrying out a statistical exercise whose mechanics I had forgotten; to Susan Lee for introducing me to survivors' groups in Ontario; and to Amanda Goodall who was highly enterprising in investigating the connections between the new survivors' organizations and the mass media that are discussed in Chapter 7. I am also most grateful for the funding supplied by the Social Research Division of the London School of Economics and by STICERD, the Suntory Toyota International Centre for Economics and Related Disciplines.

-xxvii-

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After Homicide: Practical and Political Responses to Bereavement
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • General Editors' Introduction vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgements xxvii
  • Contents xxix
  • Figures xxxi
  • Tables xxxii
  • Abbreviations xxxiii
  • Dramatis Personae xxxv
  • 1 - Homicide in England and Wales 1
  • 2 - Bereavement after Homicide 28
  • 3 - Bereavement as a Career 57
  • 4 - The Moral Economy of the Homicide Survivor 91
  • 5 - Beginnings: From The Compassionate Friends to Parents of Murdered Children 136
  • 6 - Victim Support and Parents of Murdered Children 168
  • 7 - The Campaigning Survivors: Justice for Victims, Activism, and the Mass Media 206
  • 8 - The Politics of Justice for Victims 241
  • 9 - The Evolution of SAMM 278
  • 10 - Conclusion 321
  • Index 334
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