Justice and the Environment: Conceptions of Environmental Sustainability and Theories of Distributive Justice

By Andrew Dobson | Go to book overview

6
'Irreversibility' and Social Justice

THE distinguishing feature of this second conception of environmental sustainability (Conception B) is its focus on the sustaining of irreversible nature. As I pointed out in Chapter 2, irreversible nature may also be critical natural capital, but not necessarily so. Critical natural capital is capital critical for the maintenance of human life, while irreversible nature is irreversible in the sense that once it has gone it cannot be recovered. Some irreversible nature--a determinate species, for example--may be critical for human life, in which case it will straddle Conceptions A and B, and the reasons for sustaining it will be drawn from either column (this conclusion is represented in Box 5 of Table 2 by including human welfare as a reason for sustaining irreversible nature). But other species may confidently be said not to be critical for the maintenance of human life, and so their disappearance will not be a cause for concern within the confines of Conception A. In Conception B, though, 'duties to nature' make their first appearance as a reason for sustaining (irreversible) nature--that is, we may want to sustain it irrespective of whether it is functional for human welfare or not. Up to now I have referred to 'duties to nature' rather than 'obligations to nature', or 'justice to nature', because these last two descriptions would imply that nature somehow has a claim upon us in respect of obligations and/or justice. Such an implication would require substantiation of a sort which it is not my intention to provide here, although I shall spend some time in what follows discussing to what extent the language of justice--and particularly distributive justice--is applicable to the non-human natural world.

This last remark indicates that we shall be largely concerned here with the first row of the distributive justice table developed in

-165-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Justice and the Environment: Conceptions of Environmental Sustainability and Theories of Distributive Justice
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS vii
  • Contents xi
  • PART I 1
  • Introduction 3
  • 1- Environmental Politics And Distributive Justice 12
  • PART II 31
  • 2- Three Conceptions Of Environmental Sustainability 33
  • 3- The Dimensions of Social Justice 62
  • PART III 85
  • 4- 'Critical Natural Capital' And Social Justice (part L) 87
  • 5- 'Critical Natural Capital' And Social Justice (part Ii) 132
  • 6- 'Irreversibility' and Social Justice 165
  • 7- 'Natural Value' and Social Justice 216
  • Conclusion 240
  • References 263
  • Index 275
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 284

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.