Objective Prescriptions, and Other Essays

By R. M. Hare | Go to book overview

5
PHILOSOPHY AND CONFLICT

5.1 . IT seems that every few weeks we hear on the radio or the other media of a new violent conflict that has broken out in some part of the world either between nations or within them. And we very seldom hear that some existing conflict has been resolved; most of them go on and on. The conflicts are the result of differences, often of the most radical sort, between groups of people. These may be differences simply in material interests, or in religion, or in ideology, or in anything else which can make people fight one another. Can philosophy do anything to help resolve these conflicts? They will be resolved, if at all, either by rhetoric, often leading to violence, or by the use of reason. Philosophy contributes to both of these methods; but the second is preferable. There are many obstacles to the settlement of these differences. But one of the main obstacles is bad philosophy. Philosophy well done can help people to understand one another, even if they come from quite different backgrounds and have competing interests. But if done badly it can hinder this, or even make it impossible. I am going to describe various ways in which bad philosophers achieve this barrier to communication, and then I shall say how good philosophers can remedy the trouble.

The first way of doing philosophy badly I can pass over quite quickly. There is a kind of philosophers--perhaps they are in the majority--who do not want to communicate, that is, make themselves understood. Philosophy should be exciting, and I do not want to take away the excitement of doing it. But excitement is like any other kind of pleasure. If you seek the pleasure or the excitement for its own sake, you do not get it. When one listens to or performs in a great piece of music (for example, singing in the performance of Schütz's or Brahms's Requiem), it is the music one wants, not the pleasure. One cannot have that pleasure without that music. The pleasure comes, as Aristotle put it, as a supervenient end ( EN 1174b33). It 'perfects the

____________________
"'Philosophy and Conflict.'" English version of "'Philosophie et conflit'", in Revue de méta- physique et morale 99 ( 1994). From O. Neumaier et a.l., eds., Applied Ethics in a Troubled World ( Dordrecht: © Kluwer, 1997).

-55-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Objective Prescriptions, and Other Essays
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 234

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.