The Triumph of Campaign-centered Politics

By David Menefee-Libey | Go to book overview

to this order, exploring the content and implications of each paradigm. Second, it documents the development of national party responses to the contemporary order, which culminated in the common political practices of the 1980s and 1990s. By demonstrating the confluence of factional politics with arguments over paradigms of analysis and action, it shows that the historical developments of the campaign- centered order have emerged from intensely political processes, without any obvious or preordained outcome.

Analytically, the book's central value is in outlining a new way of thinking about American electoral politics, one that may offer a fuller, more comprehensive analysis than the piecemeal "party system" and "party decline/resurgence" approaches. By investigating the interrelated components of the contemporary electoral order--professionalized campaigns, struggling parties, competitive and often "split-level" elections, a fragmented and changing electorate, and so on--we can better understand America's troubled version of representative democracy.


NOTES
1.
Jeff Fishel, ed., Parties and Elections in an Anti-Party Age: American Politics and the Crisis of Confidence ( Bloomington: University of Indiana Press, 1978); Everett Carll Ladd, Where Have All the Voters Gone? The Fracturing of America's Political Parties, 2d ed. ( New York: Norton, 1982); and William J. Crotty and Gary C. Jacobson, American Parties in Decline ( Boston: Little, Brown, 1980).
2.
Barbara G. Salmore and Stephen A. Salmore, Candidates, Parties and Campaigns: Electoral Politics in America, 2d ed. ( Washington, D.C.: CQ Press, 1989); Alan Ehrenhalt, The United States of Ambition: Politicians, Power, and the Pursuit of Office ( New York: Times Books, 1991); Martin P. Wattenberg, The Rise of Candidate Centered Politics: Presidential Elections of the 1980s ( Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1991).
3.
See, for example, David Price, Bringing Back the Parties ( Washington, DC: CQ Press, 1984); Xandra Kayden and Eddie Mahe Jr., The Party Goes On ( New York: Basic Books, 1985); Larry J. Sabato, The Party's Just Begun (Glenview, Ill.: Scott, Foresman/Little, Brown, 1988); and Paul S. Herrnson, Party Campaigning in the 1980s ( Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard, 1988).
4.
Philip A. Klinkner, ed., Midterm: The Elections of 1994 in Context ( Boulder, Colo.: Westview, 1996).
5.
See, for example, Daniel M. Shea and John C. Green, eds., The State of the Parties: The Changing Role of Contemporary American Parties (Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield, 1994); and James A. Thurber and Candice J. Nelson, ed., Campaigns and Elections American Style ( Boulder, Colo.: Westview, 1995).
6.
Lawrence C. Dodd and William E. Hudson have independently developed similar democratic standards. See Dodd, "Congress and the Politics of Renewal: Redressing the Crisis ofLegitimation,"

-9-

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The Triumph of Campaign-centered Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • 1 - Parties, Elections, and American Democracy 1
  • Notes 9
  • 2 - The Campaign-Centered Electoral Order 11
  • Notes 27
  • 3 - The Foundations of Campaign-Centered Politics 32
  • Notes 44
  • 4 - Campaign-Centered Politics Leaves the Parties Behind 49
  • Notes 63
  • 5 - Reform and the Search for a New Party-Centered Politics 66
  • Notes 86
  • 6 - Embracing Campaign-Centered Politics 92
  • Notes 112
  • 7 - The New Politics on Capitol Hill 118
  • Notes 148
  • 8 - Campaigns and Parties in the Senate 154
  • Notes 176
  • 9 - The New Conventional Wisdom, Fraying at Its Edges 181
  • Notes 204
  • 10 - The Resilience of Campaign-Centered Politics 211
  • Notes 220
  • Index 223
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