The Triumph of Campaign-centered Politics

By David Menefee-Libey | Go to book overview

in all, some 630,000 donors answered the call in 1995-96, giving $200 or more and providing nearly $600 million in the 1996 elections (not including money they gave to PACs or to the parties' soft money accounts). Despite their financial importance, these donors make up less than 1/4th of 1 percent of the nation's population.

Indeed, if you look solely at those who gave $1,000 or more, you find that the number of donors is something under 235,000--about 1/10th of 1 percent of the American public. 29

In short, the proportion of Americans who finance and most directly influence the conduct of campaign-centered politics is extremely small.

Party organizations may succeed in capturing and channeling a growing share of that money, but their success does not mitigate the effects of money on our democracy. Further, both parties and campaigns are increasingly funded by soft money, which is raised in even larger denominations from an even smaller share of the voting public. The Supreme Court may yet allow the regulation of such funds, but until it does, campaign-centered politics will increasingly be the province of those who can afford it. The spending goes up and the turnout goes down.

So challenges remain for the future. American democracy is a work in progress, and if history is any guide, political parties will be at the center of the next transformation.


NOTES
1.
Jeane J. Kirkpatrick, The New Presidential Elite: Men and Women in National Politics ( Beverly Hills, Calif.: Sage, 1976). See also B. Bruce-Briggs, ed., The New Class? America's Educated Elite ( New York: McGraw Hill, 1979).
2.
Jeane J. Kirkpatrick, Dismantling the Parties: Reflections on Party Reform and Party Decomposition ( Washington, D.C.: American Enterprise Institute, 1978), 11-12.
3.
Robin Kolodny and Angela Logan, "Political Consultants and the Extension of Party Goals," PS: Political Science and Politics 50 ( June 1998): 155-59.
4.
Pew Research Center for The People and The Press, "Public Appetite for Government Misjudged," 18 June 1998. Published at http://www.people-press.org/leadrpt.htm.
5.
Lloyd A. Free and Hadley Cantril, The Political Beliefs of Americans: A Study of Public Opinion ( New Brunswick, NJ.: Rutgers University Press, 1967); E. J. Dionne, Why Americans Hate Politics ( New York: Simon and Schuster, 1991).
6.
Pew Research Center for The People and The Press, "The Views of Political Consultants: Don't Blame Us," 18 June 1998. Published at http://www.people-press.org/con98rpt.htm.

-220-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Triumph of Campaign-centered Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • 1 - Parties, Elections, and American Democracy 1
  • Notes 9
  • 2 - The Campaign-Centered Electoral Order 11
  • Notes 27
  • 3 - The Foundations of Campaign-Centered Politics 32
  • Notes 44
  • 4 - Campaign-Centered Politics Leaves the Parties Behind 49
  • Notes 63
  • 5 - Reform and the Search for a New Party-Centered Politics 66
  • Notes 86
  • 6 - Embracing Campaign-Centered Politics 92
  • Notes 112
  • 7 - The New Politics on Capitol Hill 118
  • Notes 148
  • 8 - Campaigns and Parties in the Senate 154
  • Notes 176
  • 9 - The New Conventional Wisdom, Fraying at Its Edges 181
  • Notes 204
  • 10 - The Resilience of Campaign-Centered Politics 211
  • Notes 220
  • Index 223
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 230

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.