Ethics in Congress: From Individual to Institutional Corruption

By Dennis F. Thompson | Go to book overview

5
Corrupt Connections

This legislation [the Gifts Reform Act] says that for $20 and 1 penny . . . we are not to be trusted. . . . I am not for sale, and I do not believe others in this body are for sale.

When Senator Malcolm Wallop spoke these words against the proposed ban on gifts in the Senate, he expressed a view shared by many members as well as by many longtime observers of Congress.1 Most members do not trade their votes or services for gifts, he argued, so banning gifts is not necessary to prevent corruption.2 The premise of Wallop's argument is surely right: most members are not for sale in the way he has in mind. But the conclusion does not follow. Gifts and other contributions to members do give rise to corruption--not usually the individual corruption that marks the most notorious cases, but the institutional kind that emerges in the practices of everyday legislative life.

This chapter examines the connections between gains that members receive and the services they give. In the current practice of legislative ethics, connections are typically presumed innocent until proven to fit the model of individual corruption. Bribery is the paradigm. At the same time, it is presumed that individual corruption must be defined narrowly so that some common exchanges in politics, especially campaign contributions, do not turn out to be bribes. If these presumptions are not examined, many ethically questionable connections escape scrutiny. Legislative ethics should take a

-102-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ethics in Congress: From Individual to Institutional Corruption
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Contents ix
  • Preface xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1- Purposes Of Legislative Ethics 10
  • 2- Dynamics of Legislative Corruption 26
  • 3- Gains of Office 49
  • 4- Services of Office 77
  • 5- Corrupt Connections 102
  • 6- Tribunals Of Legislative Ethics 131
  • Conclusion 166
  • Appendix: Charges of Ethics Violations Considered by Congress, 1789-1992 182
  • Notes 191
  • Conclusion 237
  • Index 239
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 248

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.