People, Church, and State in Modern Russia

By Paul B. Anderson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IV
Marxism and Religion

AS a starting point in this review, we must remind ourselves of the fact that Marxism is not an ideology among other ideologies to which it can remain neutral, but a philosophy which its adherents believe to be the summa of all other philosophies, the residues of which are either dead, dying or deserving of death. Marxism is not a sect growing alongside of the main road of civilization. Said Lenin:

The genius of Marx lies exactly in the fact that he provided the answers to questions which the leading thinkers of mankind had already posed. His teaching arose as the direct and unbroken continuation of the teachings of the greatest representatives of philosophy, political economy and socialism. . . . The teaching of Marx is all powerful because it is true. It is complete and systematic, giving to people an integrated world view incompatible with superstition, with reaction, or with the defence of bourgeois oppression. It is the lawful successor of the best that mankind created in the XIX century in German philosophy, English political economy and French Socialism. Materialism turned out to be the only consistent philosophy true to all the teachings of natural science, inimical to superstition, magic, etc. The enemies of democracy endeavored therefore by every means to disprove, undercut, slander materialism, and defended various forms of philosophical idealism, which always amount in the end to be a defence or support of religion.1

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1
Lenin: Three Sources and Three Essential Elements of Marxism, 1913.

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